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Monday, February 22, 2010

Mid-February 2010 SST Anomaly Update

I’ve moved to WordPress.  This post can now be found at Mid-February 2010 SST Anomaly Update
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Not much to report.

Weekly NINO3.4 SST anomalies for the week centered on February 17, 2010 show that central equatorial Pacific SST anomalies have leveled off for the past few weeks. Presently they’re at 1.21 deg C.
http://i47.tinypic.com/29bm04g.png
NINO3.4 SST Anomalies

Refer also to Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology ENSO Wrap-Up webpage for other indicators:
http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/enso/

Weekly Global SST anomalies are still elevated. While they are lower than the peak this ENSO season, the Global SST anomalies appear content to cycle where they are now. There’s still no indication that there will be a lagged rise, but they also not dropping very quickly.
http://i45.tinypic.com/54by2o.png
Global SST Anomalies

SOURCE

OI.v2 SST anomaly data is available through the NOAA NOMADS system:
http://nomad3.ncep.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/pdisp_sst.sh?lite=

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Bob,

I am just curious why your current global SST graph using Ol.v2 data starts on Jan 3, 1990.

The Ol.v2 global and regional SST graphs you created back on Feb 8 all started on Nov 1981.

Cutting out the earlier 9 years of data doesn't have anything to do with the fact that it starts 0.2C lower does it? I am surprised you didn't start it on Jan 1988, but that may have been too obvious I suppose.

Dennis H.

Bob Tisdale said...

Dennis H: You wrote, "I am just curious why your current global SST graph using Ol.v2 data starts on Jan 3, 1990."

Easy answer, Dennis. The WEEKLY OI.v2 data is broken down into two subsets. The current one starts in Jan 1990. All of my mid-month updates include WEEKLY data from 1990.

You wrote, "Cutting out the earlier 9 years of data doesn't have anything to do with the fact that it starts 0.2C lower does it? I am surprised you didn't start it on Jan 1988, but that may have been too obvious I suppose."

That's a pretty silly question and assumed answer, there, Dennis. You need to be more observant or check the sources before you accuse me of Cherry-Picking.

Anonymous said...

Bob,

OK thanks for the clarification.

If I can ofer a suggestion, it probably would be an excellent idea for you to document the time periods of your raw data sources on your graphs.

That is unless you want your readers to always have to undertake that type of research (i.e., check your sources) every time they look at your graphs.

Dennis H.

Erl said...

Hi Bob,
Very interesting strong increase in sea surface temperatures in places like the North Atlantic, Indian Ocean and south Pacific in the first two weeks of February. This indicates, to me at least, an increase in ozone in the stratosphere/upper troposphere, tied to the dive in the AO index. There has been warming in the Arctic especially between 30hPa and 1 hPa tied to vortex phenomena. This suggests that the cycles in ocean temperature have a strong short term aspect....periods of the order of less than a month where a variation in the incidence of sunlight is involved.

I note also extreme swings in the daily value of the SOI in the same period. My source for that is Long Paddock.

K-Bob said...

Bob,

Any thoughts on the concept that older temperature data (pre satelite era) fails to reflect the real sst data and shows a bias in the temperature record. I have become ultra aware of the impact of the sst data on the global temperature data. This current winter shows cold temperatures in the temperate zones where most people live, but the satelite data shows the global temp to be above normal. Did our ancestors measure a cold period when it was actually much warmer due to a warm sst? Your thoughts are much appreciated. Thanks, K-Bob.

Bob Tisdale said...

K-Bob: You asked, “Any thoughts on the concept that older temperature data (pre satelite era) fails to reflect the real sst data and shows a bias in the temperature record.”

I haven’t found anything out of the ordinary. Before the satellite era, all of the SST products (HADSST2, HADISST, ERSST.v3b) use the COADS dataset as their base, and they all bias the data before 1941 upwards to account for a shift in measuring methods. That actually reduces the overall trends. For those datasets that infill the missing data (HADISST & ERSST.v3b) there are some differences but those are based on the methods used.

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